United States of America

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In Tucson, Subsidies for Rainwater Harvesting Produce Big Payoff

Water Deeply | 2018-01-18

The Arizona city has spent more than $2 million subsidizing rainwater harvesting systems. Consultant Gary Woodard explains that results from a new study he is leading show such systems don’t just collect water, they also change behavior.

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U.S. State Water Plans Are Ready for Review

Circle of Blue | 2014-07-14

Three U.S. states with anticipated water supply deficits in the coming decades reached milestones in July in their deliberations on how to meet the demands of cities, farmers, and industries. Arkansas and Kansas submitted draft water plans last week for public review. Later this month Colorado's nine river basins will submit individual plans that will be assessed by state officials and aggregated into a document that establishes statewide goals and priorities.

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WATER Detroit Water Brigade Fights for Basic Human Right of Clean Drinking Water

Ecowatch | 2014-07-14

There are many variables that factor into water access, including geography, socio-economics,climate change. The fact that water is necessary to sustain human life, however, is undeniable. In 1977 the United Nations Water Conference declared water to be a human right, stating “All peoples, whatever their stage of development and social and economic conditions, have the right to have access to drinking water in quantities and of a quality equal to their basic need.” The UN has reaffirmed this principle many times in the subsequent decades, and in 2009, concluded, “States have an obligation to address and eliminate discrimination with regard to access to sanitation.” 

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Monitoring Streams for Sediment

Great Lakes Commission/US Army Corps of Engineers | 2014-07-02

Dates: July 9-10, 2014   Location: Ivy Court Inn Express & Suites, 1404 Ivy Court, South Bend, IN 46637 (http://www.southbend-hotel.com/)   The United States Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE), and the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) are pleased to present a two-day introductory course on monitoring sedimentation in Indiana's streams, entitled “Monitoring Streams for Sediment.”   Sediment is a leading source of pollution to our waterways, impacting water quality, aquatic habitat, recreational opportunities and aesthetic conditions. This workshop is suitable for professionals responsible for managing sediment in rivers and watersheds as well as interested volunteers, and will include a mix of classroom and field sessions. You will learn about sediment and river features, how to monitor changes in a river channel over time through basic surveying and pebble counts, and how to map and document your observations for later analysis.   An...

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Irrigation brought fat harvests to the plains. But the water is disappearing

Brett Walton | 2014-06-25

Irrigation brought fat harvests to the plains. But the water is disappearing. Industrial agriculture on the Great Plains began in the 1950s when mechanized pumps and sprinkler irrigation systems allowed trillions of gallons of water to be pulled each year from the Ogallala Aquifer, the primary water supply for parts of eight states.

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Water Cut-off in U.S. City Violates Human Rights, Say Activists

IPS | 2014-06-25

UNITED NATIONS, Jun 19 2014 (IPS) - When the United Nations reaches out to resolve a water or sanitation crisis, it is largely across urban slums and remote villages in Asia, Africa or Latin America and the Caribbean. But a severe water crisis in the financially bankrupt city of Detroit in the U.S. state of Michigan has prompted several non-governmental organisations and activists to appeal for U.N. intervention in one of the world's richest countries. “This is unprecedented,” said Maude Barlow, founder of the Blue Planet Project, a group that advocates water as a human right. “I visited the city and worked with the Detroit People's Water Board several weeks ago and came away terribly upset,” she told IPS.

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World's Large Cities Move Water Equivalent to Ten Colorado Rivers to Meet their Annual Water Needs

Water Currents | 2014-06-12

As cities grow in population and economic activity, they reach further and further out to find water to meet their needs. Now, a new study has estimated that collectively the world's large cities, defined as those with at least 750,000 people, move 504 billion liters (133 billion gallons) of water a day a cumulative distance of some 27,000 kilometers. Positioned end to end, the canals and pipelines transporting that water would stretch halfway around the world.   The volume transferred annually is equivalent to the yearly flow of 10 Colorado Rivers.

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Map: California's Hydraulic Empire

Circle of Blue | 2014-05-29

For almost a century, water providers and food producers in California have engaged in one of history's most ambitious industrial enterprises, focused on one objective – moving water where it does not go on its own.

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California Water Data

Circle of Blue | 2014-05-29

As the most populous U.S. state enters the summer of 2014 in the throes of a ruinous drought, new data tools put California's water crisis into context. An interactive dashboard shows current and historic reservoir levels and is updated daily. Arsenic contamination and water use data are plotted by zip code or county. And a high-resolution map illustrates the audacious canal system that binds the state together. These tools are part of Choke Point: Index, an investigation into the condition of water resources in three essential American farm regions.

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Federal Water Tap, May 27: Senate Passes Water Infrastructure, Drought Bills

Circle of Blue | 2014-05-29

Both sides of Congress passed a $US 12 billion water infrastructure package last week. The 532-page Water Resources Reform and Development Act is a doozy. It hands out money, defines policies, and orders new studies. The highlights: Project planning assessments, called feasibility studies, will be capped at three years and $US 3 million dollars, codifying Army Corps guidance issued in 2012. Exceptions for complex studies are possible. The corps will prepare a report on how drought affects the reservoirs it operates. The corps is prohibited from charging a fee for “surplus” water in the upper Missouri River Basin. North Dakota and South Dakota objected to earlier plans to charge for water supplies the corps did not need. Congress urges states that share rivers to sign water compacts. This non-binding request is directed at Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, which have struggled for decades over water releases from corps dams. The corps will close the Upper St....

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